Pet Preparedness and what you should know!

Pet Preparedness and what you should know!  This is one of those subjects that I really feel like people don’t spend enough time thinking about and they really should.   In today’s  post, we are going to look at creating a bug out bag for your pet  as well as things to consider adding to your preps for when SHTF comes and you need to take care of your furry friend.  Let’s get started folks!

There are a lot of things to consider when it comes to bugging out with your pet, and a lot of it depends on their size and what exactly they are.  For example, If you  are bugging out with a Labrador Retriever, then you could probably put them on a leash and let them run beside you while bugging out.  However, if your pet is a Chihuahua or a cat, then the needs change.  I tried walking a cat on a leash once and the hair still hasn’t grown back on my leg!  I do not recommend it at all.  In a case like that, you may want to consider carrying them in your B.O.B. for practicality reasons.  You may want to consider sedating them as well.  Some animals are very nervous and can even hyperventilate if they get too over stressed.  Trust me you just haven’t lived until you have seen a little dog start hyperventilating because they are scared.  When you are bugging out, you really need to be worried about what is going on around you and not if the dog or cat is going to make it another mile!

Now I know that some of you may be considering just letting your pets go in the wild to fend for themselves, but personally I would discourage you from doing that.  I know they are animals and should be able to fend for themselves, unfortunately that is not always the case.  If animals have never been in the wild, they just wont know how to hunt and would eventually starve to death.  That is just cruel and I would ask you not to do it to a helpless animal.  If you can’t take them with you, then just put them down and be done with it.  Larger animals like some dogs if left to the wild to fend for themselves will form hunting packs and could eventually pose a danger to children and other humans in the future.  Believe me, the last thing you will want to be worrying about in the future when you are out hunting is whether or not you will be attacked by a pack of wild dogs while on the way home from hunting.  Humans will be bad enough and you just don’t need the competition when it comes to hunting for food in a survival situation.   Take the time now to prepare now to take care of your furry friends when the time comes.

The first thing you need to do is to sit down and decide whether or not you can realistically bring your pet with you.  The sad truth is that not all animals are suited for travel and you may need to make some hard choices now rather than later.  I truly hope this is not the case for you and you can bring them with you.  I know I will be bringing my  dog with me, after that cat thing, I just never have warmed back up to cats… to say the least.  Here is what I will be putting in my dogs bug out bag for when the time comes.  Again, you will need to adapt this to what ever type and size dog (or other pet) you are bringing with you.

  • Water for 72 hours – Like humans, your pet will need water as well, so prepare to have some just in case you can’t find any on the trail. Don’t forget to bring a collapsible water bowl for them to drink out of on the way.
  • One weeks worth dried food – This would be a minimum I would think.  Now if you are bringing a hunting dog then you, you may want to bring a little more so he doesn’t eat everything you kill.  It would be just my luck to kill a rabbit and have my dog eat it before I can get to it.
  • Proof of ownership of the animal as well as proof of vaccination that it has had.  This is very important and you should always keep a copy of these in your pet’s bug out bag.  If you do not have them and you are caught by authorities they may require that the animal be put down for public safety reasons.  It would be easier to just keep the records with you.
  • Collar and ID tags that prove it is the animal on the vaccination papers. Don’t forget their leashes and some paracord so you can allow them to walk around when you need to and to tie them up for some reason.
  • Pet bed, clean blanket or towel are other good items to add to your pet’s but out bag.
  • Pet toys that your pet Is used to.  Animals get stressed just like humans and having a familiar toy to play with can go a long way towards making them feel better.
  • If your pet takes any type of medication then you will need to bring it in their bag as well.
  • Grooming supplies like brush, nail trimmer, etc. are other items that you will want to add along with any flea and tick spray you may like. Depending on the time of year, this could be a real life saver for both you and your pet.
  • Pet first aid kit – You can buy these premade or you can make your own, but in any case it is important to have one with you when you bug out.

Now I know that there are other things that could be added to this bag and I have touched on the main items that you will want to have. You can also buy Pet survival packs if you want.   I know that I love my dog and I want him to be around for a long time.  For that reason, I want to be sure that he is well taken care of when the time comes.  I’m sure that you probably feel the same way about yours and only want the best for them.  Take the time now and create a bug out bag for them.  You will be glad that you did.  Well that is it for today’s post and I hope I may have given you something to think about that will help you when the time comes and SHTF hits.  Until next time, keep on prepping!

-The Sargent-

 

The Sgt.

Prepper, Patriot, and Proud U.S. ARMY Veteran.

You may also like...

10 Responses

  1. Jane says:

    If SHTF, that is exactly what it will be. This all sounds well and good, but look at reality. If your bug out bag is already packed to the hilt for your survival, then how are you going to put in grooming tools, toys, bed, food, and extra water? A stick is the toy, your bag or the ground is your dogs bed, the food is only what you can share, even if its a teaspoon of what you can afford to take away from yourself or your children. Don’t get me wrong, we all love our pets dearly, but this is about your survival! If SHTF, civil society disappears, total chaos , for some, they will become a food source. If you get to stay at home where you have all your preps, then that is another story.

    • Anonymous says:

      Amen Jane. I really get tired of reading crapolla like this from self-styled “experts” whom, if you listened to them, you would end up filling every room in your house from floor to ceiling with prepping supplies and they’d STILL tell you that you need more.

    • knyghttime says:

      Amen Jane! I get soooooo tired of reading crapolla like this from self-styled “experts” who, if a person listened to them, would fill every room in their home from floor to ceiling with prepper supplies and would STILL be told that they need more.

  2. taxdn2poverty says:

    @Jane: You are right and I’m am wrong, this I freely admit, and also admire your courage for stating obvious facts that it is about our survival, not our pets. However, my dog is my best friend. In fact he is my only real time tested true blue never fail friend. I am him, and he is me. It’s that simple. Wrong it is, and wrong it always will be, but as long as my heart beats, my lungs draw breath, and my legs will keep me upright, I will defend him with all my might against anything and everything that comes our way. That will never change. God bless and wish you the very best.

  3. Thor says:

    They make doggie bugout bags. The dog carries his/her own food & water & what not. That’s survival at its best. Pull your own weight even if your an animal!!!

  4. Just a suggestion to include with your dog’s bug out supplies are ‘dog booties’ that protect your pet’s paws from rubble, sharp objects, ice, or broken glass.

    In an event that might have left scattered wreckage in it’s aftermath, all sorts of ground litter can be expected and should be planned for.

    The slip-on dog booties are inexpensive and can prevent a serious paw injury that might cripple your pet at a time when mobility is important for both of you.

    Your pet is the best early warning device you can have for danger and intruders so protecting him or her should be a high priority.

    As far as your own personal tootsies remember…. ‘Timber Rattlers’ (i.e exposed nails in building debris) are a hazard to your feet too and they do painfully bite seemingly at the wrong time.

    Steel shanked insoles with steel toe protection should at he top of your personal bugout apparel list.

    • Sideliner 1950 says:

      In our experience, “slip-on dog booties” really can be terrific protection for the paws, but only IF the doggie tolerates them…otherwise, as soon as you put them on, he/ she will just try to remove them — every time. So don’t just buy a set and stash them in the doggie’s pack for use in the future. Instead, begin away letting the pooch get used to wearing them until you’re sure he/ she’s ok with them. And even then, if it’s been a while since the last time, put them on your dog again from time to time. Getting your dog used to them when he/ she is young might be a good way to go, although their feet will grow some. Our last dobie loved her booties and took to them right away; and every time she saw us pull them out of the drawer she knew she was about to have an adventure outdoors. Unfortunately, our current best friend hates them and refuses to wear them, even though we’ve been trying to accustom her to wearing booties since she was 8 months old, and she’s now 3+ years old. It doesn’t happen right away — or ever — for some dogs.

  5. Anonymous says:

    And the dog is food.